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News

Founder, President, and CEO Kris Coleman spoke with the Family Club on Red Five’s expertise and full spectrum of bespoke security services for private families.

Watch the interview here

Since mid-March, Red Five has published a weekly update on the COVID-19 pandemic, providing you all with proactive steps to be better prepared, and resilient. This week, we want to hear from you to help us tailor future to pieces to your interests and needs. 

The survey should take less than two minutes to complete. We thank you in advance for your time and interest.  

Click here to take the survey.

This is Red Five’s seventh weekly report detailing proactive steps you, your family, or your company can take to be prepared for the week ahead. This report represents work product derived from various reliable sources, and contains the most accurate information available at the time of print. However, it may be based in part upon information provided by third party sources, which may be subject to change at any time.

Medical experts and administration officials warned this week that a second outbreak of COVID-19 in the fall could be more difficult and more complicated than the current outbreak as it would coincide with the start of seasonal influenza. Experts have assured the country that federal, state, and local governments will be better prepared to fight a second wave by developing therapeutics, and stocking up on critical equipment, such as ventilators and personal protective equipment (PPE).

Over the last three weeks, we have focused on things you, your family, and your company could do to be prepared and resilient for the week(s) ahead. This week, we are turning our attention to things you can do to plan and prepare for the possibility of reverting to a stay at home situation this fall.

We recommend you take the following steps in order to be prepared and resilient for the week(s) ahead.

  • Take stock of what is working well, and what is not working well. Document what’s working and what’s not working for you, your family, and your company. Take note of the highs and the lows. Don’t be too hard on yourself though; this is a novel situation for all involved.
  • Reflect on what you would do differently if you were to find yourself in a stay at home situation later on this year. Ask yourself how you would approach the situation next time around. What other resources would you need? What would you do differently to prepare? How could you be more resilient?
  • Make a simple checklist—for things you would need for the next time. Start small, and think through the items. You don’t need to create the list in one sitting. Review the list from different perspectives—kids, spouse, elderly parents.
  • Include your family members’ feedback, neighborhood inputs, and professional resources to make your plan stronger. Relationships are critical to resiliency, a positive outlook, and emotional health. Rely on professional advice that is based in reality.
  • Using your list, make a plan for how you would return to a stay at home, work from home, and/or learn from home environment. Ensure you have the right resources (e.g., food, medicine), communication tools (e.g. laptop, cellphone, chargers), and information (e.g. phone numbers and bank account numbers written down) to execute your plan.
  • Keep in mind, this too will pass. We are a resilient country, and a resilient people.

This is Red Five’s sixth weekly report detailing proactive steps you, your family, or your company can take to be prepared for the week ahead. This report represents work product derived from various reliable sources, and contains the most accurate information available at the time of print. However, it may be based in part upon information provided by third party sources, which may be subject to change at any time.

Individuals, families, and companies will need to be resilient in the weeks ahead as they continue to find themselves in a new “normal.” Businesses should focus on their local health conditions as the nation’s governors will be responsible for the reopening of states’ economies. Local conditions will drive how businesses need to phase in their return to a “new normal.”

Last week, we focused on steps you and your family could do to be prepared and resilient for the week(s) ahead. This week, we are turning our attention to ways companies can prepare and be resilient for the week(s) ahead.

We recommend you take the following steps in order to be prepared and resilient for the week(s) ahead.

  • Reduce expenses where you can but balance that with keeping employees employed, or otherwise close so that may be rehired quickly when appropriate.
  • Continue to retain a ready reserve of cash, and secure additional sources of working capital to weather the downturn. By now companies should have applied for the federal SBA loans and/or the Paycheck Protection Program.
  • Employ technology that allows employees to work securely regardless of geographic restrictions. This includes hardware, software, training, and bandwidth resources. Get what you need now so you are better prepared.
  • Begin to pivot to modified products and services that allow you to maintain income in the new normal, and pay your core employees and vendors for as long as possible. You will need to be creative, and should have a plan in place to shift to those modified offerings. Communicate those adjustments to clients, old and new, quickly and clearly. Ask your clients what they need, and ask your team what they think they can do more of, and more efficiently in the new normal.
  • Continue your planning for a phased return to work. The first week back will be different and it will continue to change. European companies are starting to return back to work on a rolling basis, with core staff returning to the office first, followed by other staff members.
  • Plan for a resurgence of cases this fall, and the possibility that we could find ourselves in a stay at home situation again.
  • Keep in mind, this too will pass. We are a resilient country, and a resilient people.

Join Red Hands Helping in our COVID-19 Efforts:

Red Hands Helping, our charitable arm, is extending support to multiple organizations making a community impact during the coronavirus outbreak.

In April, we proudly supported Food & Friends, a local organization serving meals to those with illnesses throughout the DMV and the Center for Disaster Philanthropy COVID-19 Response Fund, supporting preparedness, containment, response, and recovery for individuals and first responders impacted by the virus.

In May, Red Hands Helping is contributing to Feed the Fight, a DMV organization which is purchasing meals from local restaurants and delivering them to local
healthcare workers and first responders. 

Red Hands Go Green, our charitable environmental initiative, is also contributing to Rock Creek Conservancy and the Smithsonian National Zoo's COVID-19 Emergency Fund. Rock Creek Conservancy is the only organization dedicated solely to conserving and protecting our local Rock Creek and its parks. The National Zoo's Emergency Fund supports the Zoo's staff and animals while the Zoo is closed to visitors due to the pandemic.

Visit their sites to see how you can also help.

This is Red Five’s fifth weekly report detailing proactive steps you, your family, or your company can take to be prepared for the week ahead. This report represents work product derived from various reliable sources, and contains the most accurate information available at the time of print. However, it may be based in part upon information provided by third party sources, which may be subject to change at any time.

Individuals, families, and companies will need to be resilient in the weeks ahead as they continue to find themselves in a new “normal.” This is a marathon, not a sprint, and it is important to plan and prepare for the long term. Some of the most recent models and projections from the World Health Organization (WHO) and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have us returning to “normal” in mid-summer; however, some public health experts at home and abroad caution that a return to “normal” may not occur until later on this year, after a vaccine has been developed.

Last week, we focused on steps you, as an individual, could do to be prepared and resilient for the week(s) ahead. This week, we are turning our attention to ways families can prepare and be resilient for the week(s) ahead.

We recommend you take the following steps in order to be prepared and resilient for the week(s) ahead.

  • Double check your supplies. Ensure you have enough food, water, and medication to stay at home for 14 days in case you or a family member becomes ill. (Please refer back to our first COVID update for a list of recommended items.)
  • Double check the supplies of family members who may not be close by. All family members should be able to self-sustain for 14 days; this is especially important for children who live away from home and the elderly. Help them order supplies from an online retailer if they do not have enough supplies.
  • Create a plan on how and when to check in with loved ones. Studies show that routine and continuing contact can help boost the mood of loved ones who may not be able to shelter at home with you.
  • Find new ways to stay in touch and celebrate as a family. Social distancing is especially hard on those who are not at “home” with the family. Create new traditions that can include all family members, near and far. Have children read aloud to grandparents via FaceTime; celebrate birthdays and other milestones via Google Hangouts; get together for a virtual brunch or dinner party with your grown children via Zoom. Reinvent family game night in a virtual setting.
  • Get out of the house for fresh air, sunlight, and exercise (while mindful of social distancing guidelines). Walking, running, gardening, bird watching, back yard games and sports are most effective at taking your mind off of the news, and allowing you and your family to use a different part of your brain.
  • Keep in mind, this too will pass. We are a resilient country, and a resilient people.